King Tut Thread, Superior Threads

Until the next quilt

Bella Sophia

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Child's book

I'm off today to our workshop to make "over" quilts for the children of Haiti.  I am so excited.  There are 15 women coming out to sew and sew and sew and then maybe eat and eat and eat.  Of course, there will be lots and lots of gabbing amongst all of us.

Everyone is due to arrive and be ready to start at 9:30.  Then at 10:30 the caterer -- one of our fellow guild members by the name of Kim -- will start us off with lemon blueberry scones with tea and coffee.  Have I made you drool yet?  Monday I will!................I'm posting photos all next week!  Lunch is a surprise but I'll tell you all about that too next week.  All we asked the girls to bring in the line of eating utensils was their fanciest cup and saucer.  I have four to choose from
but I think I'll take this one...........
as Easter is just around the corner. 
The book featured today is
The Patchwork Path
A quilt map to freedom, written by Bettye Stroud and illustrated by Erin Susanne Bennett.  It is available from Candlewick Press.
The ISBN is 978-0-7636-3519-0
This is the story of a young girl, Hannah and her Papa escaping slavery along the Underground Railroad.  Hannah's proudest possession is the quilt her Mama taught her how to make before she passed away. The "freedom" quilt with the symbols................The monkey wrench turns the wagon wheel toward Canada on a bear's paw trail to the crossroads.  Once they got to the crossroads, they dug a log cabin on the ground.  Shoofly told them to dress up in cotton and stain bow ties and go to the cathedral church, get married, and exchange double ringsFlying geese stay on the drunkard's path and follow the stars.   
That was the quilt code.

The story tells of the journey they took from Georgia to Canada, through the nights and rainstorms that they had to endure.  The final pages of the book the people of Oakville can imagine.  Our Town was a stop on the Underground Railroad.  Our Museum has an area devoted to the story of our Black History and the road to freedom.  Captain Robert Wilson and James Wesley Hill were two local men who brought many people to Oakville across lake Ontario.  A great website to read about is here.
You have to scroll down a bit to start to read the articles.

Enjoy your day.  I can't wait for mine to start.

by Maya Angelou

"Sometimes a small thing you do can mean everything in another person's life. When you learn, teach. When you get, give."

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